Thursday, July 31, 2008

McShame: Gay Couples and Adoption


New York Times McCain Interview (Published: July 13, 2008)

Q: President Bush believes that gay couples should not be permitted to adopt children. Do you agree with that?

Mr. McCain: I think that we’ve proven that both parents are important in the success of a family, so, no I don’t believe in gay adoption.

Two weeks after McCain’s interview was published the McCain camp has back peddled all of about one millimeter. But have no fear, in an interview with George Stephanopoulos, McCain was asked the same question again. McCain provided the same answer only using different words. McCain said, “I’m running for president of the United States because I want to help with family values. I think family values are important when we have two parent families that are parents of the traditional family." McCain does not seem to understand that a gay “couple” has TWO parents. McCain was bumbling, repeating himself and trying to play a word game to dodge giving a direct answer. In the New York Times interview McCain answered the question clearly and directly, with a resounding, “no I don’t believe in gay adoption.”

John McCain’s statement, “I think that we’ve proven that both parents are important in the success of a family,” which he made to the New York Time is unfounded. Again McCain implies that “both parents” can only mean a man and a woman. Nonetheless, "30 years of scientifically valid research universally demonstrates that LGBT families are just as nurturing for children's growth and development as heterosexual families," said the Family Equality Council.

Other sources, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Psychiatric Association have issued statements supporting same-sex parents.

"Gay and lesbian parents are as likely as heterosexual parents to provide healthy and supportive environments for their children," the APA has said.

The AAP has said "scientific literature demonstrates" that kids with gay parents "fare as well in emotional, cognitive, social, and sexual functioning as do children whose parents are heterosexual. (They) seem to develop normally in every way."

In 2006 there were over one half million children in foster care in the United States. http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/stats_research/afcars/tar/report14.htm (Please keep in mind that foster care numbers are fluid, the link provides greater details such as; ages, sex, race, where they are placed, how many entered, how many existed, it is all very interesting.)

Gay adoption problems exist for both gay women and gay men, however, it may be slightly more of an issue on the gay male side, since they have zero means to reproduce. In either case, it remains an issue of intolerance and hatred. Obviously, when we live in a country where parentless children need homes, and there are couples who want to adopt and provides homes, yet the government says no because the couple is gay, we have a problem. This is intolerance defined to a level of stupidity and is totally unacceptable. A free country has no room available for an intolerant bigoted government. The remedy is simple common sense. Realize the existence of humanity in all and exercise fair and equal rights. Let homes be found for these children and let families flourish. One more reason I support Barack Obama for President.

2 comments:

Jamie said...

I've never understood how supposedly "good" people could think that it was better to be in the revolving door shame of foster care than in a loving family. Gays and Lesbians have been raising children ever since there were children to be raised. The fact that they now wish to do it openly doesn't change that fact.

No child should be deprived of a loving home with two parents of whatever composition because of the prejudice of small minds.

Trevor said...

Jamie, thanks for the comment. Today we went out to lunch and there was a gay couple with their baby. The baby was a precious little girl, and the parents looked so pleased, it just warmed my heart to see this little family altogether....

All I could think was, what a lucky little girl! She's not alone anymore.